Experts Address

Master of Science in
Electronic Commerce and Internet Computing
Experts Address Series 2016 - 17
Organized by MSc Programme Office, Department of Computer Science, HKU

 

The ECom-IComp experts address series is designed primarily to keep students and alumni of our programme up-to-date with the information technology and electronic business trends around the world.

We invite our eminent overseas instructors and distinguished guests to give the public address, which forms an important part of the learning process, and also facilitates our programme participants to network with local industry and business leaders.  Instructors and guests can also present unusual topics they are passionate about or which they think deserve more public attention.

 

Professor Norman Sadeh

Director, Mobile Commerce Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, e-Supply Chain Management Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

Co-Director, COS PhD Program, Carnegie Mellon University

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
21, March 2017 ( Tuesday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Theatre C, LG1/F
Chow Yei Ching Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
HKU Map

Abstract

The Internet of Things is expected to lead to an explosion in devices and services developed by a myriad of providers.  This diversity has the potential of making security and privacy even more challenging than they are today. Just like mobile app developers, IoT providers can be expected to often be inexperienced and lack the awareness and sophistication necessary to protect the security and privacy of their end users.  To make matters worse, these devices and services will often be deployed and managed by equally unsophisticated users, who, in contrast to professional system administrators, will often misconfigure them and open the door to a number of vulnerabilities.  The consequences could be dramatic, from massive DDOS attacks such as those that brought down many sites in October 2016, to the hacking of critical everyday objects such as your car or pacemaker, or the breach of critical elements of our infrastructure.

In this presentation, Prof Sadeh will draw on parallels with mobile app stores to illustrate possible approaches to mitigating risks in the Internet of Things.  The presentation will draw on examples from research conducted in my research group at Carnegie Mellon University.

Professor Michael Shamos

Professor Michael Shamos

Distinguished Career Professor, Institute for Software Research, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, eBusiness MSIT degree program, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, Universal Library, Carnegie Mellon University

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
06, March 2017 ( Monday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 102, 1/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
HKU Map

Abstract

The development and public acceptance of driverless cars has been very rapid.  Twenty driverless Uber cars now regularly offer rides in the U.S. city of Pittsburgh.  The implications of autonomous vehicles are profound, from public safety to commuting, delivery of goods and automobile insurance.  But how do driverless cars work, and are they trustworthy?  In this largely non-technical talk we will take a look under the hood and review the amazing components of a driverless vehicle.  Videos showing how a driverless car sees its environment are included.

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Professor Amy Shuen

CEO, Nanoforma

Former Professor, The Wharton School and Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
07, November 2016 ( Monday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :

Room 202, 2/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

Pocket Monsters, animated Japanese characters are popping up everywhere - in 92+ countries and 550 million smartphones.  Millions of Pokemon Go players and their smartphones have walked 4.6Billion kilometers in search of Pikachu and 150 other well-loved Pokemon characters.

Join Professor Shuen to find out why Pokemon Go matters to strategy and innovation.

The free-to-play augmented reality game generates $10M in in-app revenue/day and is 2016's best example of a $12B digital transformation.  Learn how smartphone apps have changed the economics of strategy and innovation, accelerating the path from digital startup to "unicorn", $1B+ private companies.  The lightning-fast, huge success of Pokemon Go shows combinatorial innovation at Niantic Labs, digital innovation at Google and exponential innovation at Nintendo.  Best of all, a free-to-play game has brought millions of new customers and foot traffic to local businesses, municipalities, art museums, parks and public venues all around the world. Gotta Catch em All!

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Professor Renato Iannella

Principal Architect, Semantic Identity

Adjunct Professor, Queensland University of Technology

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
12, October 2016 ( Wednesday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 102, 1/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

Digital contracts are mechanisms to express the terms and conditions for digital content usage.  Many attempts in the past have struggled with proprietary Digital Rights Management (DRM) infrastructure to assure content and rights information are transparently transacted.  Digital permissions can also support Privacy and other policy assertions related to usage of digital data where no enforcement is desirable.  With the emergence of HTML5 and Encrypted Media Extensions, we can envisage a truly open DRM system with digital contracts.

This presentation will provide an overview of the past and present work in digital rights, and the emerging W3C permission expression language (ODRL).  It will also cover the potential disruption with contract data becoming a part of the BlockChain infrastructure to support independently verifiable rights transactions.

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Professor Alan Montgomery

Professor Alan Montgomery

Associate Professor of Marketing at the Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University

Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
20, July 2016 ( Wednesday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 101, 1/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

Prediction underlies most decisions and range from precise numerical forecasts generated by predictive analytical models to qualitative statements made about upcoming events.  For example, businesses need to be able to predict sales in order to efficiently allocate production resources, scientists want to predict climate change, city officials need to anticipate traffic backups, and consumers routinely make decisions about unknown products like whether they purchase a new movie.  In other words prediction is ubiquitous and necessary.  Unfortunately, most managers are ill equipped to predict key events or numbers, having neither the technical skills nor the right mindset.  Perhaps the most common mistake is overconfidence.  The challenge is that many predictions are made with limited data available and are made without the help of a systematic methodology.

In this seminar we consider some examples of prediction and recent research about the psychology of prediction and empirical findings about good forecasters.  The findings show that forecasters can overcome their biases and make predictions not only in data rich environments but also ones that are data poor.  Some suggestions for improving predictions are updating predictions frequently, using "baselines", learning from mistakes, providing probabilistic not deterministic predictions, avoiding the use of ideological beliefs as the basis for predictions, and combining multiple and potentially disparate sources of information.

Professor Norman Sadeh

Director, Mobile Commerce Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, e-Supply Chain Management Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

Co-Director, COS PhD Program, Carnegie Mellon University

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
02, June 2016 ( Thursday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Theatre C, LG1/F
Chow Yei Ching Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

The global market for smartphones is huge - more than 1.4 billion are sold every year - just about the population of China. Samsung leads the market with about a 20% share. Apple is #2 at about 14%, but this varies considerably each year. Apple owns patents covering some of the most fundamental user gestures, such as pinching to reduce the size of an image and two-finger scrolling. Samsung has patents of its own. The patent fight between the giants is fierce, and has extended to courtrooms in the U.S., Korea, Europe, Australia and Japan, involving billions of USD in claims. This talk will present the main technical issues behind this worldwide battle.

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Professor Michael Shamos

Professor Michael Shamos

Distinguished Career Professor, Institute for Software Research, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, eBusiness MSIT degree program, Carnegie Mellon University

Director, Universal Library, Carnegie Mellon University

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
03, March 2016 ( Thursday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
CPD-2.4.2, 2/F
Centennial campus
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

The global market for smartphones is huge - more than 1.4 billion are sold every year - just about the population of China. Samsung leads the market with about a 20% share. Apple is #2 at about 14%, but this varies considerably each year. Apple owns patents covering some of the most fundamental user gestures, such as pinching to reduce the size of an image and two-finger scrolling. Samsung has patents of its own. The patent fight between the giants is fierce, and has extended to courtrooms in the U.S., Korea, Europe, Australia and Japan, involving billions of USD in claims. This talk will present the main technical issues behind this worldwide battle.

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Mr Peter Looms

Former Multimedia Senior Consultant, Danish Broadcasting Corporation;

Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU;

Date & Time :
19, November 2015 ( Thursday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 201, 2/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road

Abstract

In recent months there have been heated discussions about unregulated services that make use of apps for services involving travel in private cars (Uber) or overnight stays in private homes (AirBnB).

Those in favour of these new services argue that change is inevitable. Those against them raise a variety of arguments: lack of customer guarantees or safety and unfair competition.

The issue is whether start-ups that launch innovative apps have to stay within the existing regulatory framework or can offer apps that work outside existing regulation?

One field that appears to be less controversial is health and wellness. But if we scratch the surface, the same conflicts can be found. What do we do in cases like this?

A great deal depends on size, on 'mice' and 'elephants'. If the organisation is a resource-rich company the strategic options for innovation are very different from those open to small startups with limited resources.

Apple and Samsung both have toolkits and R&D programmes to help grow the app market in this field.

The presentation makes use of recent cases that include solutions for 

  • persons with serious hearing impairments
  • individuals who have had a heart attack and are undergoing rehabilitation
  • persons with atrial fibrillation and
  • COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

The presentation uses a variety of strategy tools including stakeholder analysis, business ecosystem analysis and the LEAN approach to business model development.

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Professor Amy Shuen

CEO, Nanoforma

Professor, The Wharton School and Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
11, November 2015 ( Wednesday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 201, 2/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
HKU Map

Abstract

Nanotechnology has already made a big impact in materials and electronics, but new breakthroughs in nanomedicine and molecular-sized pharmaceuticals promise to have a transformative impact on life sciences and the fight against cancer.  This is straight out of the movies, as you will see.

Why attend this talk
Join HKU Professor Amy Shuen on her Fantastic Voyage into the cancer nanomedicine world.  As an Entrepreneurship professor-turned Biotech-CEO, Amy jump-started her faculty-co-founded Nanoforma, a preclinical UCSF-Berkeley-Stanford nanomedicine startup with the latest in business model practices, the *Life Sciences Lean Launchpad method.  This method reinvents translational research, bridging the gap between basic research and the clinic, enabling a better and faster bench to bedside transition.

The top U.S. science research funding agency, NIH-the National Institutes of Health--invested $30B in 2015.  Last year, they developed the *Life Sciences Lean Launchpad program (with best-selling author Steve Blank) to train over 500 teams of researchers on translating their inventions and breakthroughs into commercial success-faster and with less money.

Instead of a formal but potentially flawed Business Plan, the Lean Startup process uses a one-page draft Business Model Canvas that is continually revised and updated.  All initial business ideas or hypotheses about---who are the customers, why will they buy and at what price, what is the product and value proposition, are there key influencers, partners and channels-are systematically tested by scientific researchers themselves.  They "get out of the building" and talk to many experts.  Each team builds an incredible network and ecosystem along the way, by talking to at least 70 experts in 7 weeks' time.

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Professor Renato Iannella

Head of Innovation and Emerging Technologies, KnowledgeFlux

Adjunct Professor, Queensland University of Technology

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
14, October 2015 ( Wednesday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Theatre C, LG1/F
Chow Yei Ching Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
HKU Map

Abstract

The emergence of services like Uber and AirBnB have more than just disrupted the traditional industries in which they serve. Traditional Knowledge Management together with Enterprise Information Architecture now have a new kid on the block to push the value of information assets. This talk will look at the relationship between the traditional knowledge/information paradigms and the knowledge economy and proposes the beginning of the collective intelligence economy.

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Instructor Image-Professor Bebo White

Professor Bebo White

Departmental Associate (Emeritus), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University

Adjunct Professor, University of San Francisco

Visiting Professor, Department of Computer Science, HKU

Date & Time :
24, September 2015 ( Thursday )
7pm - 8pm

Venue :
Room 202, 2/F
KK Leung Building
The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road
HKU Map

Abstract

We are presently on the verge of an exciting new chapter in the Information Age. This chapter will be characterized by three disruptive technologies influencing how data is generated, distributed, and analyzed and by a struggle over how these technologies can be effectively managed and used. The technologies involved in this revolution are Big Data, Data Science, and the "Internet of Things (IOT)". Individually these fields have stirred great interest, but together they promise to change forever the ways we communicate, live our lives, conduct business, and acquire knowledge. This talk will explore both the potential and the pitfalls that need to be addressed in preparation for this convergence.

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